What is Cryptocurrency? Simple Explanation Bitcoin Insider

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This subreddit is dedicated to inform and discuss the revolutionary cryptocurrency Stablecoin.
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What is Bitcoin Cash, a virtual currency? Thorough explanation of features and usage

What is Bitcoin Cash, a virtual currency? Thorough explanation of features and usage submitted by raaner12 to Altcoinss [link] [comments]

@Reuters: As more central banks seek to create their own digital currencies, here’s an explanation on how they differ from other cryptocurrencies, like bitcoin https://t.co/zenCnVkuI7

@Reuters: As more central banks seek to create their own digital currencies, here’s an explanation on how they differ from other cryptocurrencies, like bitcoin https://t.co/zenCnVkuI7 submitted by -en- to newsbotbot [link] [comments]

Amazing Explanation About How Bitcoin Cryptos Work vs Normal Currency

Amazing Explanation About How Bitcoin Cryptos Work vs Normal Currency submitted by Rufflenator to 3bitcoins [link] [comments]

Amazing Explanation About How Bitcoin Cryptos Work vs Normal Currency

Amazing Explanation About How Bitcoin Cryptos Work vs Normal Currency submitted by ososru to Bitcoin4free [link] [comments]

Boom! Introducing Bitcoin! Animated Explanation: Bitcoin - the future currency?

Boom! Introducing Bitcoin! Animated Explanation: Bitcoin - the future currency? submitted by manfromnantucket1984 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I don't understand the idea of tainted coin & clean coin in bitcoin,since bitcoin is a virtual currency,how on earth can it get tainted,because we are not physically touching it like fiat currency,please I need a detailed explanation on this .

submitted by marinesouths to darknet [link] [comments]

How Bitcoin mining REALLY works - an in-depth technical explanation of the proof-of-work algorithm that makes Bitcoin the most secure currency in the world

How Bitcoin mining REALLY works - an in-depth technical explanation of the proof-of-work algorithm that makes Bitcoin the most secure currency in the world submitted by SimilarAdvantage to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Unlimited is a bug by itself - ELI5 explanation of how BU would centralize the currency

Bitcoin Unlimited is a bug by itself - ELI5 explanation of how BU would centralize the currency submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Some explanation regarding bitcoin vs digital currency issued by banks?

Can anyone explain what stops banks or nations or unions from making an own digital currency? In what way does bitcoin has an advantages over the coins? Thanks.
submitted by DoOrNot12 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoins: The Currency of the Darknet - (biased) video explanation from OnlineMBA.com

Bitcoins: The Currency of the Darknet - (biased) video explanation from OnlineMBA.com submitted by jav_rddt to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin: A Casual and Non-Technical Explanation of Concepts Behind the Currency

Bitcoin: A Casual and Non-Technical Explanation of Concepts Behind the Currency submitted by LibertyIsRising to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin: A Casual and Non-Technical Explanation of Concepts Behind the Currency

Bitcoin: A Casual and Non-Technical Explanation of Concepts Behind the Currency submitted by moon_drone to OfficialBitcoin [link] [comments]

Funk-e Animated Explanation: Bitcoin - the future currency?

Funk-e Animated Explanation: Bitcoin - the future currency? submitted by AgentZeroM to BitcoinVideo [link] [comments]

How I finally (mis)understood Bitcoin - or a pen-and-paper based explanation of crypto-currency

How I finally (mis)understood Bitcoin - or a pen-and-paper based explanation of crypto-currency submitted by merkitt to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[xpost /r/geek] Do Bitcoins Dream of Electric Currency? An easy to digest explanation of bitcoins.

[xpost /geek] Do Bitcoins Dream of Electric Currency? An easy to digest explanation of bitcoins. submitted by RealtechPostBot to realtech [link] [comments]

Short and clear explanation regarding bitcoins and why they are better than fiat currency

Hello reddit,
My parents own 316 pharmacies in my country. I want to present bitcoins to my father and convince him to research the feasibility of using them in the business but I am struggling to prepare a layman explanation less than 200words/2 slides. Being CS graduate it is easy for me to understand them, but consider that my parents are 50+ and very computer illiterate.
Thanks
submitted by sky17 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Raoul Pal and Michael Saylor's Bitcoin vs Ethereum analysis is deeply flawed, and here is why.

Regarding the Bitcoin vs Ethereum narrative
Allocating capital in Bitcoin but not in Ethereum is a bet that the planned road-map for Ethereum will not be successfully implemented and/or its economic properties will not function as designed once the final phase of ETH 2.0 goes live. The combination of PoS, sharding and EIP-1559 will allow for a monetary policy that can sustain the system with zero, possibly negative, issuance. Detailed explanations of how this is possible has been documented through numerous interviews and blogs with developers and pundits. We also must take into consideration that even if the issuance is above zero, the returns from staking Ether must be accounted to compare the long-term holding value proposition against something like Bitcoin. If the staking rewards provide ~3% annual returns and issuance is ~2% then the equivalent issuance for a PoW protocol would be ~-1% (this will never happen in the Bitcoin protocol).
Addressing the claim that Ether is not money
The narrative that Ether is not money because the Ethereum protocol is not designed to exclusively function as money is akin to saying that the Internet is not a good emailing system because it is not exclusively designed to transmit emails. This type of narrative is trying to restrict the definition of money by suggesting that its underlying protocol should not have functionality that extends beyond the conventional way we think of it. The reality is that Ethereum is much better suited for a digital economy - Ether is its native monetary asset. The ability to issue other forms of digital assets and execute computer logic in a trustless unified system with a natively defined monetary asset encompasses all the fundamental building blocks of a future digital economy. This is a future where monetary, financial and information systems can take advantage of the inclusiveness, permissionless and trustless aspects that are central to the Bitcoin value proposition.
The Ethereum protocol is designed to do a lot of wonderful things, but it costs money to operate the network and that cost must be covered by something of value that can be easily liquidated or exchanged into other things of value.... otherwise known as money. The idea that Ether is more akin to oil than gold/money just because the price metric for computations is called "gas" falls apart under scrutiny. Ether is strictly used as a monetary incentive. It is not magically burned to propel a fictitious machine that runs the network... the computers that run the Ethereum network run under the same physical principles from the ones of Bitcoin - they consume energy and someone has to pay for it. It just so happens that the monetary rewards and cost of transactions operating the Ethereum network are done exclusively in Ether, and therefore it serves as a monetary base. In addition, Ether has been used as the monetary base for the acquisition of other digital assets during their ICO phase. Lastly, Paypal has revealed they will be including Ether as a means of payment for online merchants. Saying that Ether is not money is like saying the sky isn't blue.
Additional thoughts
  1. The combination of staking, EIP-1559 and sharding will allow ETH to reduce issuance ahead of Bitcoin's schedule. It is very likely going to allow for sustainable zero issuance which is something that is still up in the air for Bitcoin.
  2. The switch from PoW to PoS will dramatically reduce the operational cost of the network while incentivizing ownership of Ether. The reduction in operational cost is a huge factor contributing to a sustainable monetary policy.
  3. The true soundness of Ether as a store of wealth needs to account for the returns from staking. That means that even if the nominal issuance remained higher than Bitcoin, it could still a better investment when you account for the staking returns.
  4. Ethereum can operate as an entire financial system. It allows for issuance of new tokens and it can operate autonomously as a digital assets exchange... so that means that it can be an exchange for tokenized FIAT currencies, cryptocurrencies, tokenized securities and commodities. Think of a global market for stocks, commodities, future contracts and derivatives.
  5. The integration with digital assets is done natively in one network. Ethereum serves as a native monetary asset with sound properties. Tokenized bitcoins would not only significantly reduce security (value would be lost if EITHER network is compromised) it also makes little sense if Ethereum's soundness (staking - issuance) is superior to Bitcoin.
  6. There are a gazillion more use cases for Ethereum that would benefit from having a natively defined monetary asset.
  7. Ultimately Bitcoin might serve as digital gold as a hedge against Ethereum. So they can coexist, but they are still competing with each other in terms of building value. Every investor who is getting into cryptocurrencies should be asking what assets to buy and why. Money allocated to Bitcoin cannot be allocated to Ethereum and vice-versa.
submitted by TheWierdGuy to ethereum [link] [comments]

Raoul Pal and Michael Saylor's Bitcoin vs Ethereum analysis is deeply flawed... here is why.

Regarding the Bitcoin vs Ethereum narrative
Allocating capital in Bitcoin but not in Ethereum is a bet that the planned road-map for Ethereum will not be successfully implemented and/or its economic properties will not function as designed once the final phase of ETH 2.0 goes live. The combination of PoS, sharding and EIP-1559 will allow for a monetary policy that can sustain the system with zero, possibly negative, issuance. Detailed explanations of how this is possible has been documented through numerous interviews and blogs with developers and pundits. We also must take into consideration that even if the issuance is above zero, the returns from staking Ether must be accounted to compare the long-term holding value proposition against something like Bitcoin. If the staking rewards provide ~3% annual returns and issuance is ~2% then the equivalent issuance for a PoW protocol would be ~-1% (this will never happen in the Bitcoin protocol).
Addressing the claim that Ether is not money
The narrative that Ether is not money because the Ethereum protocol is not designed to exclusively function as money is akin to saying that the Internet is not a good emailing system because it is not exclusively designed to transmit emails. This type of narrative is trying to restrict the definition of money by suggesting that its underlying protocol should not have functionality that extends beyond the conventional way we think of it. The reality is that Ethereum is much better suited for a digital economy - Ether is its native monetary asset. The ability to issue other forms of digital assets and execute computer logic in a trustless unified system with a natively defined monetary asset encompasses all the fundamental building blocks of a future digital economy. This is a future where monetary, financial and information systems can take advantage of the inclusiveness, permissionless and trustless aspects that are central to the Bitcoin value proposition.
The Ethereum protocol is designed to do a lot of wonderful things, but it costs money to operate the network and that cost must be covered by something of value that can be easily liquidated or exchanged into other things of value.... otherwise known as money. The idea that Ether is more akin to oil than gold/money just because the price metric for computations is called "gas" falls apart under scrutiny. Ether is strictly used as a monetary incentive. It is not magically burned to propel a fictitious machine that runs the network... the computers that run the Ethereum network run under the same physical principles from the ones of Bitcoin - they consume energy and someone has to pay for it. It just so happens that the monetary rewards and cost of transactions operating the Ethereum network are done exclusively in Ether, and therefore it serves as a monetary base. In addition, Ether has been used as the monetary base for the acquisition of other digital assets during their ICO phase. Lastly, Paypal has revealed they will be including Ether as a means of payment for online merchants. Saying that Ether is not money is like saying the sky isn't blue.
Additional thoughts
  1. The combination of staking, EIP-1559 and sharding will allow ETH to reduce issuance ahead of Bitcoin's schedule. It is very likely going to allow for sustainable zero issuance which is something that is still up in the air for Bitcoin.
  2. The switch from PoW to PoS will dramatically reduce the operational cost of the network while incentivizing ownership of Ether. The reduction in operational cost is a huge factor contributing to a sustainable monetary policy.
  3. The true soundness of Ether as a store of wealth needs to account for the returns from staking. That means that even if the nominal issuance remained higher than Bitcoin, it could still a better investment when you account for the staking returns.
  4. Ethereum can operate as an entire financial system. It allows for issuance of new tokens and it can operate autonomously as a digital assets exchange... so that means that it can be an exchange for tokenized FIAT currencies, cryptocurrencies, tokenized securities and commodities. Think of a global market for stocks, commodities, future contracts and derivatives.
  5. The integration with digital assets is done natively in one network. Ethereum serves as a native monetary asset with sound properties. Tokenized bitcoins would not only significantly reduce security (value would be lost if EITHER network is compromised) it also makes little sense if Ethereum's soundness (staking - issuance) is superior to Bitcoin.
  6. There are a gazillion more use cases for Ethereum that would benefit from having a natively defined monetary asset.
  7. Ultimately Bitcoin might serve as digital gold as a hedge against Ethereum. So they can coexist, but they are still competing with each other in terms of building value. Every investor who is getting into cryptocurrencies should be asking what assets to buy and why. Money allocated to Bitcoin cannot be allocated to Ethereum and vice-versa.
submitted by TheWierdGuy to ethtrader [link] [comments]

I've been sharing conspiracies on reddit longer than this sub has been around. I have a story to tell.

This story is mostly crafted from my own experiences, my conversations with some of the people involved, and the rest is my own guesswork as I try to fill in the gaps...so bear with me!
That's why I wanted to share with this community, which I've watched grow over the years. I remember posting about the death of Barry Jennings (who witnessed explosions in the WTC on 9/11) the day after it happened. This was before /conspiracy (or right around when it was formed), and I remember thinking "we really need a sub for conspiracies on reddit!"
And here we are, 12 years later and over 1.3 million subscribers...incredible!
So...
My story starts with a young man. We'll call him Andrew.
Andrew grew up in the 90's in a coastal US town and quickly blossomed into a tech whiz at a young age.
He began building his own computers, and after a brief stint using Windows, he decided that Bill Gates was everything wrong with technology (and the world), and he made it his mission to make sure folks like Gates were NOT the future of computers.
He really believed that the use of technology was a fundamental human right, and that charging people for "proprietary" OS's that hid their source code was a violation of these rights.
He saw a possible Deus Ex-like future, with a technocracy literally around the corner if we didn't act now.
Andrew soon joined the Free Software Foundation and began rubbing elbows with the likes of Richard Stallman. He begun exclusively using GNU/Linux and was the type to correct you if you called it just "Linux". He also began visiting tech-savvy forums like slashdot and started networking in earnest.
By 2006 (his senior year of high school) Andrew was completely over his "education" and decided to just drop out completely.
Shockingly, a college accepted him anyway. A small East Coast school had been actively courting Andrew, and when they learned he had failed to get his HS diploma, they accepted him anyway!
Now sometime during this period Andrew went to Iceland and stayed in Reykjavik for several months.
This trip may have happened during the summer, fall, or early winter of 2006. The reason for his trip had something to do with his efforts in the FSF or similar group. The possible significance of this trip will become clear as we go on.
What is clear is that Andrew started college in the fall of 2006, and that the circumstances were unusual. Andrew soon met several like-minded individuals and began building a social and technological network at his school.
Two individuals in particular would become key players in his life (one more prominently in this story, but the other was significant as well), and eventually the 3 would live together in town for several years.
But for now let's stick with Andrew.
Andrew had an idea to build a social network for his college. Except, it wasn't just a network, it was a wiki for information about the school...and beyond. Soon, it began to morph into something much bigger in Andrew's mind.
He saw his project as being one of many data "hubs" for leaks of important documents and otherwise sensitive information.
So yeah, he saw the opportunity for a wiki for leaks (see where this is going yet...?).
As his ambitions grew, his behavior started to become increasingly erratic. He was caught with drugs and arrested. Strangely, the charges were pretty much dropped and he was given a slap on the wrist. Eventually he decided to leave the school, but still lived in town and had access to the servers on campus.
By 2010 Andrew was still living in the small town with his two "hacker" buddies, who were still enrolled at the school.
This house was in some ways legendary. It appears that many "interesting" people spent time at or visited the residence. Indeed, some of the early movers and shakers of /conspiracy itself passed through.
There was usually a full NO2 tank for anyone who was into that kinda thing, and they were stocked with every hallucinogen and research chemical known to man.
It was also likely under surveillance by multiple intelligence agencies (NSA/Mossad/etc).
Over time, the mental state of Andrew was slowly starting to deteriorate, which wasn't helped by his abuse of drugs.
Still, Andrew decided to move his base of operations to Europe, spending time in Belgium, the Czech Republic and elsewhere.
One of his housemates was soon to join him on his adventures in Europe and elsewhere abroad. We'll call him "Aaron."
Aaron had a very similar story and upbringing as Andrew. Aaron was also from a coastal US town and was born into privilege. He was also, supposedly, born into a family with some serious connections to intelligence agencies, including an uncle with ties to the NSA, and both parents connected to military brass.
By 2015, Andrew and Aaron were living together in the Czech Republic. During this time they were working directly and/or indirectly for the NSA (via Cisco and other companies).
You see, the "college" they met at was actually a front for the recruitment of kids into the IC. Apparently, many "schools" in the US function that way. Go figure.
Their intelligence and valuable skill set (hacking etc) made them valuable assets. They were also possibly involved with the distribution of certain "research chemicals" (of the 2C* variety) to dignitaries and their entourages (in one example, they provided 2CB to a group with David Cameron).
In addition, Andrew was allegedly involved with, or stumbled upon, an NSA-linked surveillance project directed at the entire country of Malaysia, while Aaron was involved with Cisco.
Aaron himself had gotten into hot water for releasing damaging information about the NSA, and even claimed to be an NSA whistleblower, and was also possibly the individual who leaked the 2014 (or 2015) Bilderberg meeting list.
And then things went bad. Andrew quit the Malaysia project and Aaron left Cisco. It seems Andrew and Aaron were "set up" during a fiery false flag event in the Czech Republic in 2015. It may have happened at an embassy, but it's unclear which. There is no information on the web about anything like this (afaik).
Aaron was immediately targeted and spent several years on the run. Allegedly, he was added to the list of victims in the so-called "Great Game".
The Great Game is the term used for an international assassination program where intelligence agencies share a list of targets to be neutralized. The German BND and Mossad are heavily involved, as other networks. Individuals targeted by the Great Game may be offed by actual assassins, or by NPC-like humans whose minds will be influenced by mind control tech (a la Matrix...say influencing someone to ram your car unwittingly ie).
As Aaron went on the lam, Andrew soon returned to the US, shell-shocked by his experience.
Both Andrew and Aaron continue to suffer from some sort of PTSD from these series of events, rendering Andrew largely incapacitated and Aaron scattered and discombobulated.
The Meat of the Matter
OK...where does that leave us? Why am I sharing all of this? I think there's much more to this story.
So let's start speculating! Everything I'm about to say is stuff that was told to me personally. I can't vouch for any of this information, though obviously I thought it was compelling enough to share.
Here's the gist: The so-called whistleblowers you see in the media are almost all fake.
This includes: Edward Snowden, Julian Assange, Thomas Drake and William Binney (hey look, his AMA is pinned on this sub right now...no comment!). These individuals, and others, are controlled opposition. The real whistleblowers are severely punished.
For example, Bradley Manning was punished with chemical castration in jail. His "transformation" was chemically induced torture.
Andrew was not alone in his passion. There were lots of other young visionaries like him who dreamed of a freer and more transparent world.
In this story, Julian Assange was an intelligence asset...a psyop meant to steal the thunder from real activists like Andrew.
In this story, a small college-based "wiki" for government leaks was used as the model for an intelligence operation known as "wikileaks".
In this story, Andrew traveled to Iceland at some point in 2006.
When was Wikileaks founded? Wikileaks was founded by Julian Assange in December 2006, in Iceland.
Aaron discovered (legally, like Manning who had clearance to access all the data he leaked) damning information about surveillance happening by the NSA, specifically against recruits entering the US army and elsewhere.
In this story, the "Andrew" identity was co-opted and turned into "Julian Assange", and "Aaron" became "Edward Snowden".
Granted, there were probably other people that these whistleblower imposters were modeled after, but Andrew and Aaron seem like very strong contenders for some of this inspiration.
Now, much of the following may be gobbledygook (lol I spelled that right first try!) for all I know, but since I'm having a really hard time making sense of it all, I'll just include everything I can and let you guys run with it.
Here are some phrases, ideas, terms and people of note that may be involved with this story...MODS: None of this is doxing! All of the links of people are wikipedia pages or published interviews/articles. So yeah. Not dox!
IN CONCLUSION
I don't know how these terms, theories and individuals fit into this story, but that they may be somehow related.
Hopefully there are enough bread crumbs in here to keep some of you busy!
Any help/insight would be appreciated. I confess I'm not so tech-minded so I can't offer any more explanation about some of the more techy terms.
Anyway, thanks for reading, and thanks for continuing to stimulate after all these years! It's really nice to see this place continuing to thrive after all of this time!
submitted by oomiak to conspiracy [link] [comments]

Cultural Exchange between /r/Lebanon and /r/berlin

Welcome to the Cultural Exchange between /Lebanon and /berlin/
Courtesy of our friends over at /berlin/ we are pleased to host our end of the cultural exchange between the two subreddits.
The purpose of this event is to allow people from two different regions to get and share knowledge about their respective cultures, daily life, history and curiosities.

General guidelines


Quick introduction about Lebanon

Quick explanation of what is happening in Lebanon (Before the explosion): https://imgur.com/a/Ixo3v8S
Introduction
Lebanon is a tiny country in the middle east. It's bordered by Syria from the north and east, Israel from the south, and the Mediterranean Sea from the west. Syria has been in a deadly civil war since 2012. Lebanon and Israel are officially "at war" since the inception of Israel, though currently there isn't any war going on, and the last real war between the two countries happened in 2006 and lasted only 30 days.
Lebanon went into a long and deadly civil war in the 70s and 80s. It only ended when the war lords sat together and decided that instead of attempting to kill each other, why not become rulers and split the gains. Thus from the early 90s until today Lebanon has been ruled by the same warlords that fought in the civil war. The speaker of the parliament never changed, not even once, and the rest of MPs and politicians just switched ministries and places every few years to present the image of democracy.
Lebanon also has Hizbollah, an organization that is labeled as a terrorist organization by many countries. Hizbollah has more powerful intillegence and military than the Lebanese government itself. The organization has unobstructed powers, for example, it started the 2006 war with Israel without the acceptance of the official Lebanese government.
Lebanese politicians save their billions and billions of dollars in savings in banks across Europe, mainly Switzerland.
Lebanon doesn't have oil, nor a serious construction sector. Lebanon relies on the service sector and tourism to survive, both of which are almost nonexistent at this point. Lebanon has a huge crippling debt. Lebanon's capital, Beirut, was voted the most expensive city to live in in the middle east two years ago. Lebanon's passport is one of the worst passports in the world and doesn't allow you to visit any notable country without a visa.
October 2019 - Political, COVID-19 and Economical Problems
In October 2019, the government approved a law that would increase taxes, and tax the usage of Whatsapp. The Lebanese population attempted a peaceful revolution, the country effectively closed down from October until December. The revolution was successful in forcing the government to resign, but wasn't able to make the president, MPs or speaker of the parliament resign.
Things went to shit after that, unofficial capital control started in October. The bank declared that people can't withdraw money from their savings or current accounts. People weren't allowed to transfer money outside Lebanon or use any credit or debit card internationally. The government started considering a haircut. The currency started to lose value rapidly.
The official rate is currently 1$ = 1,515 LBP while the black market rate is 1$ = 8,500 LBP
The money stuck in the bank is useless, almost frozen because it can't be withdrawn without losing ~65% of it's value and even then, in small quantities.
Add to that COVID-19 is ripping the country. We're having exponential growth in the number of cases right now.
The Explosion
On August 4, 2020 multiple explosions occurred in Beirut Port that destroyed half the city, killed hundreds, with an additional large number of people missing, injured hundreds of thousands of people and made 300,000 people homeless. 80000 children displaced. The explosion was so big that it was heard and felt in Cyprus and Syria. There were reports of damages to properties from the explosions all over Lebanon, not just in Beirut.
The explosion destroyed half of the city including busy hospitals, which ended up causing people to have to deliver or have critical operations using the flash light from the doctors' cellphones.
The explosion killed several foreign nationals including French, German, Canadian, American, and Australian citizens.
This post is made to raise awareness about what happened in Lebanon by sharing the videos of the incident. Please note that those videos are graphic as they show the moment the explosion happened.
Donation Help
Any kind of monetary donation will go a LONG way during these times.
You can donate using your credit card, paypal account, bank transfer or bitcoin donation.
You can find a list of verified and safe NGOs to donate to here: https://www.reddit.com/lebanon/comments/iaakslist_of_lebanese_ngos_that_are_verified_and_safe/
You can check out some of the videos here:
Reddit Links:
submitted by ThePerito to lebanon [link] [comments]

Who can legally use Atari Token?

So the blockchain thing keeps coming up, but all the explanations are super vague and hand-wavey.
I looked-over those PDFs PowerDubs posted the other day. I still cannot figure out how this is even hypothetically supposed to work.
One proposed use is for a future online casino. Crypto casinos already exist, and they are shady. The largest bitcoin casino's CEO goes by the pseudonym "wetsuit". I assume he doesn't use his real name because of, you know, all the crime involved.
So what's Atari's plan? If Atari is selling a tool for transmitting money for gambling, this is a wire-fraud risk. If Americans try and use this token, Atari will have to function as a financial institute in compliance with US law. The obscure bank Atari has partnered with may or may not exist, but it won't hold up to scrutiny either way. Maybe some other countries are more lax about this, but a lot are even more strict. So who, exactly, will legally be allowed to use this token?
The other major purpose is for in-app purchases. If Atari lets users cash-out in-app currencies, this basically turns EVERY GAME into a gambling game. Game companies don't want to be fined for running money laundering operations, so they don't usually make it easy to cash-out in-app currency. "Blockchain" doesn't change this. If reputable companies don't want this, why would they work with Atari? Why would Atari even offer this?
There are other proposed uses as well. None of these ambitious plans amount to anything unless the token has some value in "fiat". Game industry workers still need to pay rent and buy groceries, wherever they live. Workers don't want to be payed in coupons they can only spend on overpriced app stores like RobotCache.
The whitepaper even says something about Atari Token helping people without internet access. Sure Jan. If Facebook couldn't figure this out with Libra, what hope does Atari have?
Again, who will legally be allowed to use this token for its proposed purpose? How does being on the blockchain actually benefit anyone?
submitted by ComradeSnuggles to AtariVCS [link] [comments]

Bitcoin endgame

Hi everybody I am still getting started in the world of cryptocurrencies, focusing on understanding how bitcoin works. I chose bitcoin because it is the most established cryptocurrency and with the higher chance of becoming a full fledge currency worldwide, being used by everyone (at least that’s what I think at the moment, I might be wrong here) I know that the practical limit for bitcoin is 21 million bitcoins and each bitcoin can be divided into 100 million satoshi. My question is, assuming bitcoin takes over as a single global currency and everyone is using it, isn’t the total amount of satoshi too little? I mean, if you split the total amount of bitcoin by everyone in the world, each person receives a relative small amount of bitcoin (I did a rough estimate, and from my estimates, each person would have the equivalent of 30€ in bitcoin)
Thanks in advance for dedicating the time to this weird question :)
EDIT:
Thank you all for the answers. Like it has been said I agree that the main obstacle for bitcoin to become the one currency on a global scale is politics because no one, in this case governments would like to loose control of their money.
With the increase in market cap and the subdivision of satoshi’s (part that I was unaware of), bitcoin could be used as the global currency because, at the same time, bitcoin would have enough “value” to represent the global economy and would be divisible enough to a reasonable value for cheap stuff like a bottle of water.
The main technical issue that I see at the moment is the difference to fiat in how bitcoin is stored (hardware wallets) and transferred between two entities (addresses and private keys). For me it is something that I am starting to understand but I think it would be close to impossible for the majority of people that are older / not so tech oriented. I haven’t yet bought bitcoin, just got a bit of exposure to it using Revolut and decided to explore it on a deeper level.
One other thing that was referred was that subdividing satoshi’s is similar to “printing” money and would lead to inflation. I understand why this is being said, because creating money or dividing the current supply into smaller amounts can be seen as having the same overall effect. I think that the key difference in the division of satoshi’s is that it is not controlled by a central authority. For example if a new base unit that corresponded to 1/100 of a satoshi was created, everyone would be affected equally. When money is being printed by a central bank or government, they are increasing their wealth by making everyone else poorer, since they are increasing the percentage of money they have (note that I am not an economist and this explanation probably is flawed).
submitted by AlexDRibeiro to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Bitcoin: The New Currency Explained What is a BitCoin? Explained - Tech Tips - YouTube Bitcoin and Cryptocurrencies Explained in One Minute - YouTube What is Cryptocurrency? A Simple Explanation - YouTube What is Bitcoin? Bitcoin Explained Simply for Dummies ...

Putting it down in simple terms, the definition goes like this: bitcoin is a digital currency, existing only on internet. It can be considered as a file that is created and transferred around using computers, which are seen as bitcoin nodes. It is not governed by a single entity nor is an institution responsible for its value. It is completely decentralized asset that is moved by the market ... Simple Explanation. Cryptocurrency is a new medium of exchange and acts as an alternative to virtual currencies. Skip to main content ... This is a digital currency that uses cryptography encryption techniques to regulate the generation of units of currency and verify the transfer of funds. What makes cryptocurrency different from other exchanges is its immunity to government interference or ... Bitcoin is often referred to as digital cash due to its ability to be transacted over the internet in a manner similar to physical cash, but the digital gold analogy makes more sense due to the monetary properties of bitcoin. In the beginning, 50 bitcoin were created roughly every ten minutes, but that increase in supply is halved every four years. The issuance schedule will continue until ... While dedicating a whole episode to bitcoin was exceptional for a fictional show, the topic of cryptocurrency has appeared on other series before, such as Mr. Robot, Startup, CSI Cyber, The Good ... Bitcoin, the digital currency, has been all over the news for years. But because it’s entirely digital and doesn’t necessarily correspond to any existing fiat currency, it’s not easy to understand for the newcomer. Let’s break down the basis of exactly what Bitcoin is, how it works, and its possible future in the global economy.

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Bitcoin: The New Currency Explained

What is Cryptocurrency? https://blockgeeks.com/ A digital or virtual currency that uses cryptography for security. A cryptocurrency is difficult to counterfe... I did my best to make this the type of video you can show to a relative at a family reunion without getting "the look" :) An easy-to-follow animation which s... Bitcoin: The new currency explained Double Bitcoin With Gladiacoin In 90 Days For more explanation go to: http://www.BitcoinCurrencyRevolution.com To signup ... This introduction to bitcoin explains what is a crypto-currency and what exatly is a bitcoin? Also touched on are the other major currencies such as litecoin... Start trading Bitcoin and cryptocurrency here: http://bit.ly/2Vptr2X Bitcoin is the first decentralized digital currency. All Bitcoin transactions are docume...

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